Ian & Sylvia Tyson: Four Strong Winds

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Four Strong Winds

Four strong winds that blow lonely
Seven seas that run high
All those things that don't change
Come what may
But our good times are all gone
And I'm bound for moving on
I'll look for you if I'm ever back this way

Think I'll go out to Alberta
Weather's good there in the fall
I got some friends that I can go to working for
Still I wish you'd change your mind
If I ask you one more time
But we've been through that a hundred times or more

CHORUS: Four strong winds that blow lonely
Seven seas that run high
For those things that don't change, come what may
But our good times are all gone
And I'm bound for moving on
I'll look for you if I'm ever back this way

If I get there before the snow flies
And if things are going good
You could meet me if I send you down the fare
But by then it would be winter
There ain't too much for you to do
And those winds sure can blow cold way out there

CHORUS: Four strong winds that blow lonely
Seven seas that run high
For those things that don't change, come what may
But our good times are all gone, and I'm bound for moving on
I'll look for you if I'm ever back this way






songwriter: Ian Tyson

performed by: Ian & Sylvia

date released: 1963 by the Brothers Four; re-released by Ian & Sylvia in 1964; re-released by Neil Young in 1978

Country music legend, Ian Tyson, was born in 1933 in Victoria, B.C. In his teens, Tyson was an intinerant logger and rodeo rider until a dangerous fall ended his career. While still recovering, Tyson began to write songs and sing. He got his start in Vancouver at the popular Robson Street eatery, the Heidelberg Cafe, singing while diners were enjoying their meals.

In 1958, Tyson graduated from the Vancouver School of Art and moved to Toronto to work as a commercial artist. There he met Sylvia Fricker and together they formed a musical act called Ian & Sylvia and began performing in the club scene in Yorkville.

Fame, fortune and four years later, Ian and Sylvia married and moved to the big skies of Alberta. As a partnership, they wrote and recorded hit songs such as "Four Strong Winds" and "Someday Soon."

Borrowing from Bob Dylan in a song about a wind [Blowin' in the Wind], Tyson wrote "Four Strong Winds" about a character he knew well from Canada:
the migrant worker. There was one unifying thread to these workers: they moved around like the four winds. From the book, "100 Top Canadian Singles, Tyson tells author Bob Mersereau:
"Canada has many seasonal workers, and when the weather turns harsh, they must move on and find a different kind of work. Many of these people cross the country every year---from the
tobacco harvest in Ontario to the wheat harvest on the prairies to apple picking in British Columbia. With the advent of fall, they move on, perhaps to return in the spring."

Ian Tyson was a maverick even then. In his lyrics, he retained "Alberta" in an industry where Canadian artists were advised to leave out local references if they wanted to break into the music scene in the U.S. Tyson's journeyman story set a standard for other songwriters of true patriot North such as Neil Young and Joni Mitchell.

Covered by many artists, "Four Strong Winds" recorded by Neil Young in 1978 became the best known recording around the world. Check for it under NEIL YOUNG.

Between the years of 1971 and 1975, the charismatic Ian Tyson had a television show eponymously called "The Ian Tyson Show." While he was enjoying great commercial success, his marriage to Sylvia was failing. It ended in divorce in 1975, and Tyson retreated to reconnect with his first love, the training of horses in the ranch country of southern Alberta.

After a three-year hiatus, Tyson began recording again and enjoyed the flush of a second musical career on his own.

Twelve albums, two Juno Awards, six Canadian Country Music Awards and many other honours later, Ian Tyson was invested into the Order of Canada in 1994. In 2006, "Four Strong Winds" was voted by CBC music fans as the greatest Canadian song of all time.






















Four Strong Winds

Four strong winds that blow lonely
Seven seas that run high
All those things that don't change
Come what may
But our good times are all gone
And I'm bound for moving on
I'll look for you if I'm ever back this way

Think I'll go out to Alberta
Weather's good there in the fall
I got some friends that I can go to working for
Still I wish you'd change your mind
If I ask you one more time
But we've been through that a hundred times or more

CHORUS: Four strong winds that blow lonely
Seven seas that run high
For those things that don't change, come what may
But our good times are all gone
And I'm bound for moving on
I'll look for you if I'm ever back this way

If I get there before the snow flies
And if things are going good
You could meet me if I send you down the fare
But by then it would be winter
There ain't too much for you to do
And those winds sure can blow cold way out there

CHORUS: Four strong winds that blow lonely
Seven seas that run high
For those things that don't change, come what may
But our good times are all gone, and I'm bound for moving on
I'll look for you if I'm ever back this way






songwriter: Ian Tyson

performed by: Ian & Sylvia

date released: 1963 by the Brothers Four; re-released by Ian & Sylvia in 1964; re-released by Neil Young in 1978

Country music legend, Ian Tyson, was born in 1933 in Victoria, B.C. In his teens, Tyson was an intinerant logger and rodeo rider until a dangerous fall ended his career. While still recovering, Tyson began to write songs and sing. He got his start in Vancouver at the popular Robson Street eatery, the Heidelberg Cafe, singing while diners were enjoying their meals.

In 1958, Tyson graduated from the Vancouver School of Art and moved to Toronto to work as a commercial artist. There he met Sylvia Fricker and together they formed a musical act called Ian & Sylvia and began performing in the club scene in Yorkville.

Fame, fortune and four years later, Ian and Sylvia married and moved to the big skies of Alberta. As a partnership, they wrote and recorded hit songs such as "Four Strong Winds" and "Someday Soon."

Borrowing from Bob Dylan in a song about a wind [Blowin' in the Wind], Tyson wrote "Four Strong Winds" about a character he knew well from Canada:
the migrant worker. There was one unifying thread to these workers: they moved around like the four winds. From the book, "100 Top Canadian Singles, Tyson tells author Bob Mersereau:
"Canada has many seasonal workers, and when the weather turns harsh, they must move on and find a different kind of work. Many of these people cross the country every year---from the
tobacco harvest in Ontario to the wheat harvest on the prairies to apple picking in British Columbia. With the advent of fall, they move on, perhaps to return in the spring."

Ian Tyson was a maverick even then. In his lyrics, he retained "Alberta" in an industry where Canadian artists were advised to leave out local references if they wanted to break into the music scene in the U.S. Tyson's journeyman story set a standard for other songwriters of true patriot North such as Neil Young and Joni Mitchell.

Covered by many artists, "Four Strong Winds" recorded by Neil Young in 1978 became the best known recording around the world. Check for it under NEIL YOUNG.

Between the years of 1971 and 1975, the charismatic Ian Tyson had a television show eponymously called "The Ian Tyson Show." While he was enjoying great commercial success, his marriage to Sylvia was failing. It ended in divorce in 1975, and Tyson retreated to reconnect with his first love, the training of horses in the ranch country of southern Alberta.

After a three-year hiatus, Tyson began recording again and enjoyed the flush of a second musical career on his own.

Twelve albums, two Juno Awards, six Canadian Country Music Awards and many other honours later, Ian Tyson was invested into the Order of Canada in 1994. In 2006, "Four Strong Winds" was voted by CBC music fans as the greatest Canadian song of all time.






















+31 -5
Quiz #: 2982
Victoria's Ian Tyson and his wife, Sylvia, wrote and recorded their first hit,
Quiz by: Sharon Michiko Yoneda
Intermediate

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