Stompin' Tom Connors: Moon-Man Newfie

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Moon Man Newfie

You might think it's goofy
but the man in the moon is a Newfie
And he's sailing on to glory
away in the golden dory
He's sailing on to glory away in the golden dory

Codfish Dan from Newfoundland
he dreamt that he had three wishes
And he took Mars and all the stars
and he turned them into big fishes
He said the sky was much too dry
and he made a wavy motion
and the moon like a boat began to float upon the starry ocean

CHORUS: And you might think it's goofy
but the man in the moon is a Newfie
and he's sailing on to glory
away in the golden dory
Sailing on to glory
away in the golden dory

One night he strayed to the Milky Way
to cast his nets upon it
He spied the tail of a great big whale
and he harpooned Hailey's Comet
He never had a pot for the fish that he caught so he had to use the Big Dipper
And the sun, by Jove, was a very good stove for cooking up smelts and kippers

CHORUS: And you might think it's goofy
but the man in the moon is a Newfie
and he's sailing on to glory
away in the golden dory
He's sailing on to glory
away in the golden dory

Now the northern lights that seem so bright
like nothing could be grander
Well, they're just waves that the moon boat made for the Newfoundland commander
And don't you sigh and say,
"Oh my, what gross exaggerations!"
'Cause he'll tell you the dream was true
when Codfish Dan awakens

CHORUS: And you might think it's goofy
but the man in the moon is a Newfie
And he's sailing on to glory
away in the golden dory
He's sailing on to glory
away in the golden dory

And you might think it's goofy
but the man in the moon is a Newfie
And he's sailing on to glory
away in the golden dory
Sailing on to glory away in the golden dory






songwriter: Stompin' Tom Connors

performed by: Stompin' Tom Connors

date released: 1973 by Stompin' Tom Connors

Newfoundland English has distinct features which distinguish it from standard English spoken on the mainland. The Newfoundlander dialect is similar to the accent heard in the southeast of Ireland, specifically Wexford and Waterford. Other island dialects are similar to those from West Country England or a combination of both.

Because of Newfoundland's remote location which separated it from the mainland by a strait of water, the population remained isolated and their dialect remained distinct from the currents of linguistic change on the mainland.

Some phonological distinctions can be heard in the song, "Moon-Man Newfie." These are:

1. The dental fricative /th/ is replaced by the nearest voiced or voiceless alveolar stop /t/ or /d/. So 'the' sounds like /da/ in the song: "but /da/ man in /da/ moon is a Newfie."

2. Vowel sounds differ in Newfoundland English, a carryover from Irish linguistic systems. Dipthongs merge from /ai/ to /oi/, "line-loin" type of mergers.

3. The Newfoundland /r/ is more distint than the standard English /r/: /doRy/, /MaRs/, /staRs/, etc.

Although Stompin' Tom is not from Newfoundland, he was born in Saint John, New Brunswick, and spent his youth in Skinner's Pond, Prince Edward Island with an adopting family. As a teenager, Stompin' Tom went travelling and ended up in northern Ontario where the Francophone influence was strong. The co-writer of some of his songs was bartender, Gaet Lepine, whose Francophone background undoubtedly influenced some of Stompin' Tom's linguistic versatility.










Moon Man Newfie

You might think it's goofy
but the man in the moon is a Newfie
And he's sailing on to glory
away in the golden dory
He's sailing on to glory away in the golden dory

Codfish Dan from Newfoundland
he dreamt that he had three wishes
And he took Mars and all the stars
and he turned them into big fishes
He said the sky was much too dry
and he made a wavy motion
and the moon like a boat began to float upon the starry ocean

CHORUS: And you might think it's goofy
but the man in the moon is a Newfie
and he's sailing on to glory
away in the golden dory
Sailing on to glory
away in the golden dory

One night he strayed to the Milky Way
to cast his nets upon it
He spied the tail of a great big whale
and he harpooned Hailey's Comet
He never had a pot for the fish that he caught so he had to use the Big Dipper
And the sun, by Jove, was a very good stove for cooking up smelts and kippers

CHORUS: And you might think it's goofy
but the man in the moon is a Newfie
and he's sailing on to glory
away in the golden dory
He's sailing on to glory
away in the golden dory

Now the northern lights that seem so bright
like nothing could be grander
Well, they're just waves that the moon boat made for the Newfoundland commander
And don't you sigh and say,
"Oh my, what gross exaggerations!"
'Cause he'll tell you the dream was true
when Codfish Dan awakens

CHORUS: And you might think it's goofy
but the man in the moon is a Newfie
And he's sailing on to glory
away in the golden dory
He's sailing on to glory
away in the golden dory

And you might think it's goofy
but the man in the moon is a Newfie
And he's sailing on to glory
away in the golden dory
Sailing on to glory away in the golden dory






songwriter: Stompin' Tom Connors

performed by: Stompin' Tom Connors

date released: 1973 by Stompin' Tom Connors

Newfoundland English has distinct features which distinguish it from standard English spoken on the mainland. The Newfoundlander dialect is similar to the accent heard in the southeast of Ireland, specifically Wexford and Waterford. Other island dialects are similar to those from West Country England or a combination of both.

Because of Newfoundland's remote location which separated it from the mainland by a strait of water, the population remained isolated and their dialect remained distinct from the currents of linguistic change on the mainland.

Some phonological distinctions can be heard in the song, "Moon-Man Newfie." These are:

1. The dental fricative /th/ is replaced by the nearest voiced or voiceless alveolar stop /t/ or /d/. So 'the' sounds like /da/ in the song: "but /da/ man in /da/ moon is a Newfie."

2. Vowel sounds differ in Newfoundland English, a carryover from Irish linguistic systems. Dipthongs merge from /ai/ to /oi/, "line-loin" type of mergers.

3. The Newfoundland /r/ is more distint than the standard English /r/: /doRy/, /MaRs/, /staRs/, etc.

Although Stompin' Tom is not from Newfoundland, he was born in Saint John, New Brunswick, and spent his youth in Skinner's Pond, Prince Edward Island with an adopting family. As a teenager, Stompin' Tom went travelling and ended up in northern Ontario where the Francophone influence was strong. The co-writer of some of his songs was bartender, Gaet Lepine, whose Francophone background undoubtedly influenced some of Stompin' Tom's linguistic versatility.










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Quiz #: 3494
Canadian song historian, Codfish Tom sails away in the golden dory!
Quiz by: Sharon Michiko Yoneda
Low Intermediate

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